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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Creativity Crisis</em>

Book Excerpt from The Creativity Crisis

By | January 7, 2015

In Chapter 1, “Yin and Yang,” author Roberta B. Ness explores the dynamic tension between innovation and risk aversion in science past and present.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | January 1, 2015

Does Altruism Exist?, Ancestors in Our Genome, Fred Sanger—Double Nobel Laureate, and Stiffs, Skulls & Skeletons

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image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

3 Comments

image: Innovation Renovation

Innovation Renovation

By | January 1, 2015

Is the fear of funding and doing fundamental, risky research killing our ability to make breakthroughs?

3 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | January 1, 2015

January 2015's selection of notable quotes

2 Comments

image: NIH Study Canceled

NIH Study Canceled

By | December 15, 2014

The National Institutes of Health shutters its initiative to track the health of 100,000 children through adulthood.

3 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>One Plus One Equals One</em>

Book Excerpt from One Plus One Equals One

By | December 1, 2014

In Chapter 7, “Green Evolution, Green Revolution,” author John Archibald describes how endosymbiosis helped color the Earth in a verdant hue.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | December 1, 2014

Your Atomic Self, Eureka!, A Talent for Friendship, and Undeniable

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image: Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

By | November 19, 2014

Bacteria in the gut of a pregnant mouse strengthen the blood-brain barrier of her developing fetus.

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image: Neurons Regenerate in Rat Spinal Cord

Neurons Regenerate in Rat Spinal Cord

By | November 18, 2014

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego, demonstrate that neural progenitor cells grafted into injured rat spinal cords can grow long axons and connect to host neurons.

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