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Their waters served as refuges during ice ages, allowing for adaptation and the emergence of new species.

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S. Allen Counter pursued scientific questions within various cultures throughout the world.

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image: Image of the Day: Cortical Lightning Storm

Image of the Day: Cortical Lightning Storm

By | July 18, 2017

Neurons in a mouse model of autism consistently fire in response to whisker agitation.

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image: Ebola Persistence Documented in Monkeys

Ebola Persistence Documented in Monkeys

By | July 17, 2017

In tissue samples from rhesus macaques, researchers find the virus in the same immune-privileged sites where Ebola has been found to persist in humans.

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image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By | July 17, 2017

 Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

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At Harvard University the chemical biologist looks for new metabolic pathways to investigate how gut bacteria interact with one another and their hosts.

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image: Microbe Maven

Microbe Maven

By | July 17, 2017

Meet Scientist to Watch Emily Balskus, who studies the microbes that inhabit humans at Harvard University

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image: Microbiota Manipulations

Microbiota Manipulations

By | July 17, 2017

Two research teams develop tools for tinkering with a bacterial genus prominent in human guts.

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New methods could propel investigation of neural “PGO” wave patterns that may underlie critical aspects of visual experience, dreaming, and even psychosis.

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