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image: Ancient Y Chromosome Analyzed

Ancient Y Chromosome Analyzed

By | April 7, 2016

In-depth analysis of the Neanderthal Y chromosome offers insights into the ancient hominins’ split with modern humans.

2 Comments

image: Surrogate Genes Enable Reproduction

Surrogate Genes Enable Reproduction

By | January 28, 2016

Increasing the expression of two genes from non-Y chromosomes restores spermatogenesis in male mice that lack Y chromosomes.

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image: Lost Y Chromosome Genes Found on Autosomes

Lost Y Chromosome Genes Found on Autosomes

By | May 27, 2015

Mammalian Y chromosome genes with important functions are transferred to autosomal chromosomes more often than previously thought, a study shows.

3 Comments

image: Why, Oh Y?

Why, Oh Y?

By | January 1, 2015

A toothpick and a bit of chance shaped David Page’s career, which he has dedicated to understanding the mammalian Y chromosome and fetal germ cell development.

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image: Focus on Sex

Focus on Sex

By | December 29, 2014

In 2014, new research findings and guidelines brought increased attention to biological differences between males and females.

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image: Vanishing Y Chromosomes

Vanishing Y Chromosomes

By | December 4, 2014

A new study reveals an association between smoking and rates of Y chromosome loss in blood cells, which may explain elevated cancer risk among male smokers.

1 Comment

image: Week in Review: April 21–25

Week in Review: April 21–25

By | April 25, 2014

Evolution of Y chromosome; delivering gene with “bionic ears”; diversity of an important cyanobacterium; charting genome-sequencing progress; blockbuster pharma deals

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image: The Surprising Evolution of Sex Determination

The Surprising Evolution of Sex Determination

By | April 23, 2014

A detailed analysis of sex chromosomes finds unexpected evolution of functional Y chromosome genes across species.

7 Comments

image: Week in Review: November 18–22

Week in Review: November 18–22

By | November 22, 2013

Chilly mice develop more tumors; gut bacteria aid cancer treatment; two Y chromosome genes sufficient for assisted reproduction; HIV’s “invisibility cloak”

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image: It Takes Two

It Takes Two

By | November 21, 2013

Two genes from the Y chromosome are sufficient to generate male mice capable of fathering healthy offspring via an assisted reproductive technique.

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