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Scientists discover transcripts from the same gene that can express both proteins and noncoding RNA.  

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image: Phosphorylation at the Flick of a Switch

Phosphorylation at the Flick of a Switch

By | May 1, 2017

Incorporating light-controlled dimerization domains into kinases provides tight regulation of these enzymes.

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image: Picking Out Patterns

Picking Out Patterns

By | May 1, 2017

Machine-learning algorithms can automate the analysis of cell images and data.

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image: Valerie Horsley Gets Under Skin

Valerie Horsley Gets Under Skin

By | May 1, 2017

The Yale University cell and molecular biologist is probing the deep mysteries of epidermal cells.

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image: Infographic: Enzymes Controlled by Light

Infographic: Enzymes Controlled by Light

By | May 1, 2017

Custom-designed kinases have built-in switches that act as gatekeepers for the enzymes' active sites.

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From fish harvests to cottonwood forests, organisms display evidence that species change can occur on timescales that can influence ecological processes.

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image: Infographic: Proteasome Basics

Infographic: Proteasome Basics

By | May 1, 2017

The structure and function of the cell’s protein-degrading machine

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Guppies transplanted between different communities in Trinidadian streams evolved in response to changes in predation threat in just a few generations.

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image: Tissue-Clearing Technique Works on Bone

Tissue-Clearing Technique Works on Bone

By | April 26, 2017

CLARITY made mouse bones transparent while preserving fluorescent labels so researchers could visualize tagged osteoprogenitors.

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image: Scientists Stretch Neurons to Image Fine Structures

Scientists Stretch Neurons to Image Fine Structures

By | April 18, 2017

A double-expansion technique embeds brain tissue in the absorbent material of diapers to stretch out cells for easier visualization.

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