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image: Image of the Day: Green Eggs 

Image of the Day: Green Eggs 

By | May 19, 2017

Spotted salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) embryos are tinted green by the oxygen-producing algae (Oophila amblystomatis) that grow inside.

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image: Opinion: Life’s X Factor

Opinion: Life’s X Factor

By | August 4, 2015

Did endosymbiosis—and the innovations in membrane bioenergetics it engendered—make it possible for eukaryotic life to evolve?

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>One Plus One Equals One</em>

Book Excerpt from One Plus One Equals One

By | December 1, 2014

In Chapter 7, “Green Evolution, Green Revolution,” author John Archibald describes how endosymbiosis helped color the Earth in a verdant hue.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | December 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | November 18, 2013

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Bacterial Buddies

Bacterial Buddies

By | March 1, 2013

A chance encounter with a crab apple tree leads to the discovery of a new bacterial species and clues to the evolution of insect endosymbionts.

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image: The Plastid Gene Shuffle

The Plastid Gene Shuffle

By | January 1, 2013

How plastid genetic information survived (or didn’t) the endosymbiotic experience

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