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The Scientist

» nanotechnology and developmental biology

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image: Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

By | May 26, 2016

Researchers harness the power of genome editing to track cell lineages throughout zebrafish development.

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image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks. 

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image: Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

By | May 2, 2016

Newly formed neurons in the adult mouse brain oversprout and get cut back.

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image: Transparency Now

Transparency Now

By | May 1, 2016

Science is messy. So lay it out, warts and all.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By and | May 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the May 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Copper Stopper

Copper Stopper

By | May 1, 2016

This research found that coating hospital surfaces with copper helped battle microbes and the infections they spread.

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image: Nanotechnology Could Conquer Hospital-Acquired Infections

Nanotechnology Could Conquer Hospital-Acquired Infections

By | May 1, 2016

Metal ions and materials with nanoscale patterns can kill even antibiotic-resistant pathogens. 

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image: Nanoscale Defenses

Nanoscale Defenses

By | May 1, 2016

Coating hospital surfaces, surgical equipment, patient implants, and water-delivery systems with nanoscale patterns and particles could curb the rise of hospital-acquired infections.

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image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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