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In vivo imaging reveals how grafted embryonic brain cells grow, connect, and mature into contributing members of damaged visual pathways in adult mice.

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image: Faulty Statistics Muddy fMRI Results

Faulty Statistics Muddy fMRI Results

By | July 6, 2016

An analysis of the widely used technique calls into question the validity of 40,000 studies.

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image: How Dopamine Tunes Working Memory

How Dopamine Tunes Working Memory

By | June 3, 2016

Dopamine receptors in the cortex orient the brain toward the task at hand.

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image: Brain Keeps Watch During Sleep

Brain Keeps Watch During Sleep

By | April 21, 2016

The first night people sleep in a new place, one of their brain hemispheres remains somewhat alert, a study shows.

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image: Demystifying BOLD fMRI Data

Demystifying BOLD fMRI Data

By | February 17, 2016

What does blood oxygen level–dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging actually tell us about brain activity? 

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | May 1, 2015

May 2015's selection of notable quotes

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image: A Spider's Eye View

A Spider's Eye View

By | April 1, 2015

Cornell researchers probe the brains of jumping spiders to gain insight into the arachnid's visual processing capabilities.

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image: Through a Spider’s Eyes

Through a Spider’s Eyes

By | April 1, 2015

Deciphering how a jumping spider sees the world and processes visual information may yield insights into long-standing robotics problems.

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image: Zooming In

Zooming In

By | January 20, 2015

To improve the reach of optical microscopy, researchers are enlarging the biological features they wish to view.

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image: Neurons in Action

Neurons in Action

By | May 19, 2014

Researchers image the electrical impulses of the C. elegans and zebrafish nervous systems.

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