The Scientist

» language processing

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image: Singing In the Brain

Singing In the Brain

By | March 1, 2017

His first love was dance, but Erich Jarvis has long courted another love—understanding how the brain learns vocalization.

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image: Locating Language within the Brain

Locating Language within the Brain

By | April 27, 2016

Researchers map the mental semantic systems of podcast listeners.

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image: Lefties, Language, and Lateralization

Lefties, Language, and Lateralization

By | October 1, 2015

The long-sought genetic link between handedness and language lateralization patterns in the brain is turning out to be illusory.

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image: Special Delivery

Special Delivery

By | October 1, 2015

Neurons in new brains and old

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image: Whistle Stop

Whistle Stop

By | October 1, 2015

Visit the remote Turkish village where the musical language that residents use to communicate across valleys is elucidating how language is processed in the brain.

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image: Whistle While You Work Your Brain

Whistle While You Work Your Brain

By | October 1, 2015

Communication based on whistles offers a “natural experiment” for studying how the brain processes language.

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image: New Human Brain Language Map

New Human Brain Language Map

By | June 26, 2015

Researchers find that Wernicke’s area, thought to be the seat of language comprehension in the human brain for more than a century, is not.

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image: Brains in Action

Brains in Action

By | November 1, 2014

An inspiring lecturer turned Marcus Raichle’s focus from music and history to science. Since then, he has pioneered the use of imaging to study how our brains function.

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image: Imaging Musical Improv

Imaging Musical Improv

By | February 21, 2014

Some areas of the brain that typically process language are active in jazz musicians who are improvising, a study shows.

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image: Hearing Through the Chaos

Hearing Through the Chaos

By | February 21, 2013

Using Bluetooth devices in classrooms reverses dyslexia and improves reading ability.

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