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image: Image of the Day: Busy Bees

Image of the Day: Busy Bees

By | February 21, 2017

Worker bumblebees vary in how efficiently they bring pollen and nectar back to the hive—the most active foragers can make up to 40 times more trips than the least active ones.

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image: First Bumblebee Species Declared Endangered in U.S.

First Bumblebee Species Declared Endangered in U.S.

By | January 11, 2017

The federal government concludes the rusty patched bumblebee is nearing extinction.

5 Comments

image: Bumblebees Pick Infected Tomato Plants

Bumblebees Pick Infected Tomato Plants

By | August 11, 2016

Tomatoes infected with cucumber mosaic virus lure the pollinators, according to a study.

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image: Opinion: Bumblebees in Trouble

Opinion: Bumblebees in Trouble

By | June 30, 2014

Commercialization has sickened wild bumblebees around the world. Can we save them? 

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image: Insect-Inspired Sensors Improve Tiny Robot’s Flight

Insect-Inspired Sensors Improve Tiny Robot’s Flight

By | June 18, 2014

Microroboticists have designed simple sensors based on insect light organs called ocelli to stabilize a miniature flying robot.

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image: <em>The Scientist</em> on The Pulse #5

The Scientist on The Pulse #5

By | February 26, 2014

Bee virus spreads, blight-reistant potato, OCD in dogs

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image: Loss of Bees Bad for Plants

Loss of Bees Bad for Plants

By | July 23, 2013

Removing just a single bee species from an ecosystem can decrease the ability of the remaining species to pollinate plants.

1 Comment

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | February 25, 2013

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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