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» Week in Review and neuroscience

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image: Week in Review: April 20–24

Week in Review: April 20–24

By | April 24, 2015

Peer review predicts successful projects; predicting cancer drug response; excising mtDNA mutations from mouse embryos; editing early human embryos

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image: Week in Review: April 13–17

Week in Review: April 13–17

By | April 17, 2015

Sequencing tumors and normal tissue; gut microbes, metabolism, and circadian clock; oxytocin and mother mice; WHO calls for data-sharing

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image: Why DBS Works for Parkinson’s?

Why DBS Works for Parkinson’s?

By | April 14, 2015

Deep-brain stimulation may effectively treat slow movement, tremor, and rigidity in Parkinson’s patients by reducing synchronicity of neural activity in the motor cortex.

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image: Week in Review: April 6–10

Week in Review: April 6–10

By | April 10, 2015

CRISPR patents; contagious clam cancer; modeling cancer-linked cachexia; investigating immune response to Ebola

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image: Week in Review: March 31–April 3

Week in Review: March 31–April 3

By | April 3, 2015

Smaller enzyme enables CRISPR gene-editing in vivo; personalized cancer vaccines; neuroprosthetic helps “blind” rats navigate; overstated Ebola predictions

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image: A Spider's Eye View

A Spider's Eye View

By | April 1, 2015

Cornell researchers probe the brains of jumping spiders to gain insight into the arachnid's visual processing capabilities.

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image: Through a Spider’s Eyes

Through a Spider’s Eyes

By | April 1, 2015

Deciphering how a jumping spider sees the world and processes visual information may yield insights into long-standing robotics problems.

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image: Pain and Itch Neurons Found

Pain and Itch Neurons Found

By | March 31, 2015

Inhibitory nerve cells in the spinal cord stop the transmission of pain and itch signals in mice.

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image: Week in Review: March 23–27

Week in Review: March 23–27

By | March 27, 2015

Methylation of a key protein; leprosy-causing bacterium sequenced; CDC lab safety report; FDA says GM apples, potatoes “safe”

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image: Opinion: Can the Brain Be Trained?

Opinion: Can the Brain Be Trained?

By | March 23, 2015

Online brain-training is gaining popularity, but so far little evidence exists to support claims of improved cognition.

3 Comments

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