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» Week in Review, culture and neuroscience

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image: Week in Review: January 19–23

Week in Review: January 19–23

By | January 23, 2015

Genetically recoded organisms; oxytocin and autism; new human protein map; MYC, longevity, and health span

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image: Oxytocin for Autism?

Oxytocin for Autism?

By | January 21, 2015

Scientists find that the hormone improves sociability in a mouse model of autism.

1 Comment

image: Pioneering Neuroscientist Dies

Pioneering Neuroscientist Dies

By | January 19, 2015

Vernon Mountcastle, who mapped the functional landscape of the neocortex, passed away at age 96.

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image: Crossed Wires

Crossed Wires

By | January 16, 2015

From similar sets of neuroimaging data, researchers are reaching different conclusions about whether brain wiring differs between men and women.

4 Comments

image: Week in Review: January 12–16

Week in Review: January 12–16

By | January 16, 2015

Insulin, leptin, the brain, and “good” fat; CD4 vaccines and immunopathology in mice; more

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image: Week in Review: January 5–9

Week in Review: January 5–9

By | January 9, 2015

A new antibiotic; how commensal microbes defend themselves; rhinovirus replication; 23andMe’s Parkinson’s partnership

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Creativity Crisis</em>

Book Excerpt from The Creativity Crisis

By | January 7, 2015

In Chapter 1, “Yin and Yang,” author Roberta B. Ness explores the dynamic tension between innovation and risk aversion in science past and present.

1 Comment

image: Week in Review: December 29–January 2

Week in Review: December 29–January 2

By | January 2, 2015

Stem cell divisions and cancer risk; cleaning up mislabeled sequences; the history of H7N9

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | January 1, 2015

Does Altruism Exist?, Ancestors in Our Genome, Fred Sanger—Double Nobel Laureate, and Stiffs, Skulls & Skeletons

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image: Eye on the Fly

Eye on the Fly

By | January 1, 2015

Automating Drosophila behavior screens gives researchers a break from tedious observation, and enables higher-throughput, more-quantitative experiments than ever before.

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