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» Week in Review and developmental biology

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Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

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The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

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Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

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image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

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image: Week in Review: April 24–28

Week in Review: April 24–28

By | April 28, 2017

Where Zika virus persists in monkeys; more-advanced mini brains; artificial womb supports fetal lambs for weeks; cancer mutations in stem cell lines; science marches around the globe

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The lungs of extremely premature lambs supported in a closed, sterile environment that enables fluid-based gas exchange grow and develop normally, researchers report.

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image: Image of the Day: Stop Signals

Image of the Day: Stop Signals

By | April 17, 2017

Transcytosis, suppression of vesicle traffic across cells, helps reduce permeability in the blood-retinal barrier during development.

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image: Week in Review: April 10–14

Week in Review: April 10–14

By | April 14, 2017

CRISPR patent ruling appealed; CRISPR-based nucleic acid test; an experimental gene therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and a cell-based protocol for Parkinson’s disease show promise in mice

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image: Week in Review: April 3–7

Week in Review: April 3–7

By | April 7, 2017

Virus triggers gluten intolerance in mice; UK bank offers clinic-ready hESC lines; researchers debate giant virus origins; cephalopods edit RNA; scientists screen noncoding genome with CRISPR

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image: Week in Review: March 27–31

Week in Review: March 27–31

By | March 31, 2017

European Patent Office greenlights CRISPR patent; scientists reconsider a cancer drug target; NIH accepts preprints in grant applications; MERS drug developers test antibodies; experts weigh the risks and benefits of whole-exome sequencing for healthy people

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