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» taxonomy, ecology, immunology and evolution

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image: Ebola Mutation Rate Quibble

Ebola Mutation Rate Quibble

By | March 27, 2015

A study suggests that the virus may not be evolving as quickly as a previous group estimated.

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image: Ancient Beasts Classified by Collagen

Ancient Beasts Classified by Collagen

By | March 19, 2015

Protein extracted from ancient fossils identified by Darwin as some of the “strangest animals ever discovered” places the creatures amongst horses, tapirs, and rhinos on the tree of life.

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image: T Cells of the Skin

T Cells of the Skin

By | March 18, 2015

A census of adaptive immune system components in human skin reveals a variety of resident and traveling memory T cells.

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image: Oldest <em>Homo</em> Remains Yet Found

Oldest Homo Remains Yet Found

By | March 4, 2015

A newly discovered 2.8 million-year-old jawbone is thought to be that of a direct human ancestor.

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image: A Deathly Pallor

A Deathly Pallor

By | March 1, 2015

Global warming could lead to lighter-colored insects with waning immune defenses.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

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image: Drunk Monkeys

Drunk Monkeys

By | March 1, 2015

UC Berkely biologist Robert Dudley explains his "drunken monkey" hypothesis for how humans developed a taste for alcohol.

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image: Falling Out of the Family Tree

Falling Out of the Family Tree

By | March 1, 2015

A mutation in an ethanol-metabolizing enzyme arose around the time that arboreal primates shifted to a more terrestrial lifestyle, perhaps as an adaptation to eating fermented fruit.

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image: Evolutionary Rewiring

Evolutionary Rewiring

By | February 26, 2015

Strong selective pressure can lead to rapid and reproducible evolution in bacteria.

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image: Fighting Allergy with Allergen

Fighting Allergy with Allergen

By | February 25, 2015

Babies who ate peanuts were less likely to develop an allergy to the food by the time they hit kindergarten, according to a new study.

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