The Scientist

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image: The Great Big Clean-Up

The Great Big Clean-Up

By | September 1, 2015

From tossing out cross-contaminated cell lines to flagging genomic misnomers, a push is on to tidy up biomedical research.


image: Report: Impact of Biomedical Research Slipping

Report: Impact of Biomedical Research Slipping

By | August 18, 2015

Despite dramatic increases in publications, the last 50 years have seen relatively little return on investment for US public health, a study suggests.


image: The Cost of Irreproducible Research

The Cost of Irreproducible Research

By | June 10, 2015

Half of basic science studies cannot be replicated, according to a new analysis—to the tune of $28 billion a year in the U.S.


image: The Rules of Replication

The Rules of Replication

By | November 1, 2014

Should there be standard protocols for how researchers attempt to reproduce the work of others?


image: Diabetes “Breakthrough” Breaks Up

Diabetes “Breakthrough” Breaks Up

By | October 27, 2014

A hormone thought to make murine insulin-secreting cells proliferate in mice did not perform in replication studies.


image: Setting the Record Straight

Setting the Record Straight

By | October 1, 2014

Scientists are taking to social media to challenge weak research, share replication attempts in real time, and counteract hype. Will this online discourse enrich the scientific process?


image: Researching Research

Researching Research

By | April 28, 2014

Stanford University starts new center to study how scientific research can be improved.


image: Men Trigger Mouse Stress

Men Trigger Mouse Stress

By | April 28, 2014

Mice become stressed in the presence of male, but not female, experimenters, triggering a physiological response that dampens pain.


image: STAP Drama Continues

STAP Drama Continues

By | March 24, 2014

Nearly two months after researchers published papers showing that they could induce pluripotency with an external stressor, the work’s validity is still being challenged.


image: Week in Review: February 17–21

Week in Review: February 17–21

By | February 21, 2014

Human vs. dog brains; widespread neuronal regeneration in human adult brain; honeybee disease strikes wild insects; trouble replicating stress-induced stem cells


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