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The discovery of peptides, enzymes, and other gene products that confer antibiotic resistance could give clues to how it develops.

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The new fossils push the origin of the human species back by 100,000 years.

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image: ASM to Discontinue Small Conferences

ASM to Discontinue Small Conferences

By | June 6, 2017

Numerous scientists are disappointed with the American Society for Microbiology’s decision, and some are hatching plans to keep the meetings alive.

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image: Mammals May Have a 12-Hour Clock

Mammals May Have a 12-Hour Clock

By | June 6, 2017

Data point to peaks in gene expression in the morning and evening that are distinct from day-night circadian cycles.

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image: Opinion: The Virome and the Anti-vaccination Debate

Opinion: The Virome and the Anti-vaccination Debate

By | June 6, 2017

Advances in microbiome research are increasingly used in anti-vaccination arguments, yet the science actually undermines the premise of the argument.

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Lactobacillus parafarraginis metabolites hindered the growth of multiple, distantly related bacterial pathogens. 

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Researchers are beginning to uncover a link between activity level and the microbial makeup of one’s gut.

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image: Mammalian Jaws Evolved to Chew Sideways

Mammalian Jaws Evolved to Chew Sideways

By | June 1, 2017

Parallel evolution in jaws and teeth helped early mammals diversify their diets.

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image: Researchers Discover Salt-Loving Methanogens

Researchers Discover Salt-Loving Methanogens

By | May 26, 2017

Two previously overlooked archaeal strains fill an evolutionary gap for microbes.

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image: Male Fish Borrows Egg to Clone Itself

Male Fish Borrows Egg to Clone Itself

By | May 24, 2017

A fish created by spontaneous androgenesis is the first known vertebrate to arise naturally by this asexual reproductive phenomenon. 

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