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image: Epigenetic Mechanism Tunes Brain Cells

Epigenetic Mechanism Tunes Brain Cells

By | July 2, 2015

Regular replacement of histones in human and murine neurons is required for neuronal plasticity, a study shows.

1 Comment

image: Silencing Surprise

Silencing Surprise

By | June 1, 2015

A chromatin remodeler in embryonic stem cells clears the DNA for mRNA transcription while stifling the expression of noncoding transcripts.

3 Comments

image: Heritable Histones

Heritable Histones

By | September 18, 2014

Scientists show how roundworm daughter cells remember the histone modification patterns of their parents.

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image: Stockpiling Histones

Stockpiling Histones

By | February 1, 2013

Histones stored on lipid droplets in fly embryos provide a backup supply when newly synthesized ones are lacking.

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image: Conserved Chromatin?

Conserved Chromatin?

By | December 10, 2012

Archaea packages DNA around histones in a similar way to eukaryotes, suggesting that fitting a large genome into a small space was not the original role of chromatin.

2 Comments

image: A Reprogramming Histone

A Reprogramming Histone

By | October 29, 2012

The scientist who pioneered cloning has found that a histone may act as a cellular reset button.  

3 Comments

image: The Epigenetic Lnc

The Epigenetic Lnc

By | October 1, 2012

Long non-protein-coding RNA (lncRNA) sequences are often transcribed from the opposite, or antisense, strand of a protein coding gene. In the past few years, research has shown that these lncRNAs play a number of regulatory roles in the cell. For exa

5 Comments

image: Flu Fights Dirty

Flu Fights Dirty

By | September 1, 2012

Mimicking a host-cell histone protein offers flu a sneaky tactic to suppress immune response.

1 Comment

image: Boosting Antipsychotic Drugs

Boosting Antipsychotic Drugs

By | August 5, 2012

Chemicals that change the way DNA is packaged could improve the effects of current antipsychotics.

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image: DNA, Contortionist

DNA, Contortionist

By | August 1, 2012

The DNA forms known as G-quadruplexes are finally discovered in human cells.

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