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image: Art’s Diagnosticians

Art’s Diagnosticians

By | June 12, 2017

Physicians peer into the subjects of artistic masterpieces, and find new perspective on their own approach to diagnosing maladies.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Behave</em>

Book Excerpt from Behave

By | June 1, 2017

In the book’s introduction, author and neuroendocrinologist Robert Sapolsky explains his fascination with the biology of violence and other dark parts of human behavior.

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The human brain’s insular cortex is adept at registering distaste for everything from rotten fruit to unfamiliar cultures.

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Four products have already qualified for the regenerative medicine advanced therapy (RMAT) designation that provides extra interactions with the agency, and sooner.

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image: Science Celebrities: Where Are the Women?

Science Celebrities: Where Are the Women?

By | May 15, 2017

Men have traditionally stolen the spotlight as scientific popularizers on TV, but women are making names for themselves in other formats.

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The diabetic volunteer continued to produce insulin one year after she received a transplant of abdominal islet cells.

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image: Synthetic Bones: A Better Bone-Marrow Transplant?

Synthetic Bones: A Better Bone-Marrow Transplant?

By | May 9, 2017

Artificial bones produce new blood cells in mice, obviating the need for irradiation to kill off resident hematopoietic stem cells in recipients.

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Despite claims of preclinical success by a leading surgeon, doctors, scientists, and medical ethicists say the science is not ready.  

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Flavor</em>

Book Excerpt from Flavor

By | May 1, 2017

Author Bob Holmes dove into the taste-determining realm of his genome.

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image: Why I Had My Sense of Flavor Genotyped

Why I Had My Sense of Flavor Genotyped

By | May 1, 2017

One person’s quest to get to the bottom of the unique way he experiences food

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