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image: CRISPR Used in Human Embryos to Probe Gene Function

CRISPR Used in Human Embryos to Probe Gene Function

By | September 20, 2017

OCT4 is necessary for blastocyst formation in the human embryo, researchers report.

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A study of a simple marine animal suggests that the common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians may have had three germ layers instead of two.

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image: Scientists Fear DACA Cancellation

Scientists Fear DACA Cancellation

By and | September 4, 2017

Some researchers are at risk of job loss and even deportation if Trump decides to end a program that allows undocumented immigrants who arrived in the U.S. as children to obtain work permits. 

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image: Scientists Look to Epigenetics to Thwart Viruses

Scientists Look to Epigenetics to Thwart Viruses

By | September 1, 2017

Some viral pathogens modify chromatin and other epigenetic machinery, making them appealing drug targets.

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image: Baby on Board

Baby on Board

By | September 1, 2017

Many scientific conferences offer child care options that allow researchers to bring their families along for the trip.

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image: Resistance to HIV Engineered Via CRISPR

Resistance to HIV Engineered Via CRISPR

By | August 3, 2017

Mice transplanted with human hematopoietic stem cells that have an HIV receptor gene, CCR5, disrupted by gene editing allows the animals to ward off HIV infection. 

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Another case of HIV remission emerges, this time in a South African girl diagnosed as an infant and disease-free for more than eight years.

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image: Immunized Cows Produce Anti-HIV Antibodies

Immunized Cows Produce Anti-HIV Antibodies

By | July 20, 2017

Cows injected with a protein that mimics HIV’s envelope make broadly neutralizing antibodies that inhibit multiple strains of the virus.

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image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By | July 17, 2017

Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

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