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image: Filming the Nematode Brain

Filming the Nematode Brain

By | January 26, 2015

Researchers record the first whole-brain videos of an unrestrained animal, viewing neural activity as a roundworm moved freely around a Petri dish.

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image: Interferon Discoverer Dies

Interferon Discoverer Dies

By | January 26, 2015

Jean Lindemann, the virologist who helped figure out that interferons were responsible for anti-viral responses, has passed away at age 90.

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image: Oxytocin for Autism?

Oxytocin for Autism?

By | January 21, 2015

Scientists find that the hormone improves sociability in a mouse model of autism.

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image: Pioneering Neuroscientist Dies

Pioneering Neuroscientist Dies

By | January 19, 2015

Vernon Mountcastle, who mapped the functional landscape of the neocortex, passed away at age 96.

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image: Crossed Wires

Crossed Wires

By | January 16, 2015

From similar sets of neuroimaging data, researchers are reaching different conclusions about whether brain wiring differs between men and women.

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image: Inflammation Overdrive

Inflammation Overdrive

By | January 15, 2015

Experimental vaccines that specifically boost T helper cells lead to immunopathology and death in mice.

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image: Trainee Raise

Trainee Raise

By | January 12, 2015

Grad students and postdoctoral fellows supported by US National Institutes of Health National Research Service Awards land a 2 percent stipend bump in 2015.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Creativity Crisis</em>

Book Excerpt from The Creativity Crisis

By | January 7, 2015

In Chapter 1, “Yin and Yang,” author Roberta B. Ness explores the dynamic tension between innovation and risk aversion in science past and present.

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image: Fat to the Rescue

Fat to the Rescue

By | January 5, 2015

Adipocytes under the skin help fight infections by producing an antimicrobial agent.

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image: A Movable Defense

A Movable Defense

By | January 1, 2015

In the evolutionary arms race between pathogens and hosts, genetic elements known as transposons are regularly recruited as assault weapons for cellular defense.

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