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image: Seeding the Gut Microbiome Prevents Sepsis in Infants

Seeding the Gut Microbiome Prevents Sepsis in Infants

By | August 16, 2017

An oral mix of a pre- and probiotic can decrease deaths from the condition, according to the results of a large clinical trial conducted in rural India. 

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image: Opinion: We Need a Replacement for Beall’s List

Opinion: We Need a Replacement for Beall’s List

By , , , , and | August 15, 2017

Although the popular blacklist of predatory publishers is gone, the suspect journals they produce are not. 

5 Comments

There is little evidence that full treatment durations discourage the development of drug-resistant bacteria.

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image: Open Access On the Rise: Study

Open Access On the Rise: Study

By | August 7, 2017

The Scientist sat down with one of the authors of a recent analysis that quantifies the increasing incursion of open-access content into the world of scholarly publishing.

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image: Final Nail Hammered into NgAgo Coffin

Final Nail Hammered into NgAgo Coffin

By | August 3, 2017

The paper describing the gene-editing method is retracted.

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image: Microbiology Professor Wanted for Murder

Microbiology Professor Wanted for Murder

By | August 3, 2017

An arrest warrant has been issued for Wyndham Lathem of Northwestern University in connection with a stabbing death in Chicago.

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image: Ebola Persistence Documented in Monkeys

Ebola Persistence Documented in Monkeys

By | July 17, 2017

In tissue samples from rhesus macaques, researchers find the virus in the same immune-privileged sites where Ebola has been found to persist in humans.

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These institutions join around 60 others that hope to put increasing pressure on the publishing giant in ongoing negotiations for a new nationwide licensing agreement.

3 Comments

image: On Blacklists and Whitelists

On Blacklists and Whitelists

By | July 17, 2017

Experts debate how best to point researchers to reputable publishers and steer them away from predatory ones.

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image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By | July 17, 2017

Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

6 Comments

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