The Scientist

» open access and culture

Most Recent

image: Opinion: Two Steps Toward Establishing Priority of Discovery

Opinion: Two Steps Toward Establishing Priority of Discovery

By | July 19, 2016

Establishing priority of a new finding is best achieved through a combination of a rapid, scientist-controlled disclosure followed by subsequent validation, through journal-based peer review and other mechanisms.

1 Comment

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Blood Sugar</em>

Book Excerpt from Blood Sugar

By | July 1, 2016

Author Anthony Ryan Hatch relays his personal experience with metabolic syndrome.

0 Comments

image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | July 1, 2016

The Scientist reviews Serendipity, Complexity, The Human Superorgasism, and Love and Ruin

0 Comments

image: Metabolic Syndrome, Research, and Race

Metabolic Syndrome, Research, and Race

By | July 1, 2016

Scientists who study the lifestyle disorder must do a better job of incorporating political and social science into their work.

0 Comments

image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | July 1, 2016

Human Genome Project-Write; viruses are alpha predators; Zika and the Olympics

1 Comment

Ancient DNA research suggests that there were two independent agricultural revolutions more than 10,000 years ago.

1 Comment

image: Breathing Life Into Papers

Breathing Life Into Papers

By | June 12, 2016

Researchers prepare to launch an effort to make the scientific literature more dynamic.

0 Comments

image: E.U. Pushes for Open Access by 2020

E.U. Pushes for Open Access by 2020

By | June 1, 2016

European Union member states agree to an ambitious goal to make all scientific papers freely accessible within four years.

3 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Wondrous Truths</em>

Book Excerpt from Wondrous Truths

By | June 1, 2016

In Chapter 2 author J.D. Trout highlights the dividing line between truth and scientific “fact.”

0 Comments

image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | June 1, 2016

Beyond Biocentrism, The Sting of the Wild, The Birth of Anthropocene, and Ordinarily Well

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Next Generation: Nanotube Scaffolds Reconnect Spinal Neurons
  2. Mapping the Human Connectome
    Daily News Mapping the Human Connectome

    A new map of human cortex combines data from multiple imaging modalities and comprises 180 distinct regions.

  3. Stroke Alters Gut Microbiome, Impacting Recovery
  4. Your Office Has a Distinct Microbiome
RayBiotech