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» open access, ecology and developmental biology

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image: WHO: Share Trial Data

WHO: Share Trial Data

By | April 15, 2015

The World Health Organization again calls upon researchers to register clinical trial details in freely accessible databases before initiation of the study.

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image: Online Platforms to Share Medical Data Launch

Online Platforms to Share Medical Data Launch

By | April 1, 2015

The “Genes for Good” Facebook app and the Open Humans Network plan to recruit large numbers of volunteers for medical studies using social media.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

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image: Mass Retraction

Mass Retraction

By | March 27, 2015

BioMed Central retracts 43 papers it had been investigating for evidence of faked peer review.

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image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

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image: Truly Brief Communications

Truly Brief Communications

By | February 18, 2015

The Journal of Brief Ideas, a platform that publishes 200-word articles, launches in beta.

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image: University of California Doubles Down on OA

University of California Doubles Down on OA

By | January 21, 2015

The academic institution’s press is launching two new open-access initiatives to make research results and academic manuscripts publicly available.

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image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

7 Comments

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