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image: Authors Peeved by APA’s Article Takedown Pilot

Authors Peeved by APA’s Article Takedown Pilot

By | June 15, 2017

In an effort to crack down on unauthorized postings of journal articles, the American Psychological Association is policing the Internet for scientists sharing their own work. 

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image: Making Public Data Public

Making Public Data Public

By | June 8, 2017

Computational scientists develop a system for spotting data overdue for public release, and end up getting hundreds of open-access datasets corrected.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | June 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: No Place to Hide

No Place to Hide

By | May 31, 2017

Environmental DNA is tracking down difficult-to-detect species, from rock snot in the U.S. to cave salamanders in Croatia.

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image: Website Flags Wrongly Paywalled Papers

Website Flags Wrongly Paywalled Papers

By | May 31, 2017

Thousands of open access papers have mistakenly asked readers to pay access fees, but publishers are correcting the errors. 

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image: Grad Student Acquitted in Thesis-Sharing Case

Grad Student Acquitted in Thesis-Sharing Case

By | May 25, 2017

Diego Gomez was facing jail time in Colombia for posting someone else’s copyrighted thesis online.

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Harvesting lab-raised zebrafish based on their size led to differences in the activity of more than 4,000 genes, as well as changes in allele frequencies of those genes, in the fish that remained.

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image: New Resource for Banked iPSCs

New Resource for Banked iPSCs

By | May 11, 2017

Researchers describe hundreds of induced pluripotent stem cell lines from healthy individuals. 

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image: More Details on How Pesticides Harm Bees

More Details on How Pesticides Harm Bees

By | May 3, 2017

Scientists report that thiamethoxam exposure impairs bumblebees’ reproduction and honey bees’ ability to fly.

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From fish harvests to cottonwood forests, organisms display evidence that species change can occur on timescales that can influence ecological processes.

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