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image: Macchiarini Retracts Another Paper

Macchiarini Retracts Another Paper

By | March 22, 2017

The embattled thoracic surgeon blames his former employer, the Karolinska Institute, for losing data related to the retracted research.

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image: San People Write Ethical Code for Research

San People Write Ethical Code for Research

By | March 21, 2017

With lifestyles similar to our hunter-gatherer ancestors, the San people of Southern Africa are popular study subjects.

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image: Singing Through Tone Deafness

Singing Through Tone Deafness

By | March 17, 2017

Author Tim Falconer didn't take his congenital amusia lying down. With the help of neuroscientists and vocal coaches, he tried to teach himself to sing against all odds.

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image: How Bad Singing Landed Me in an MRI Machine

How Bad Singing Landed Me in an MRI Machine

By | March 1, 2017

One author's journey through the science of his congenital amusia

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image: Musical Tastes: Nature or Nurture?

Musical Tastes: Nature or Nurture?

By | March 1, 2017

Studies of remote Amazonian villages reveal how culture influences our musical preferences.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | March 1, 2017

Music, the future of American science, and more

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An experiment in which people pass each other initially nonrhythmic drumming sequences reveals the human affinity for musical patterns.

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image: The Past and Present of Research Integrity in China

The Past and Present of Research Integrity in China

By | March 1, 2017

Several initiatives aim to improve research integrity in the country, but recent high-profile cases of misconduct highlight a lingering problem.

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Seventeen scientists found to have committed research misconduct during the last 25 years have since collectively received more than $101 million in NIH funding.

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image: Publication Ban Affects Former Collaborators

Publication Ban Affects Former Collaborators

By | February 23, 2017

When the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders fired neurologist Allen Braun, the agency also barred his colleagues from publishing data collected over a 25-year period.

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