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image: Report: Plant Biologist Guilty of Misconduct

Report: Plant Biologist Guilty of Misconduct

By | July 10, 2015

Investigators find that RNAi researcher Olivier Voinnet willfully misrepresented data published in several journals.

1 Comment

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Faith vs. Fact</em>

Book Excerpt from Faith vs. Fact

By | July 1, 2015

In Chapter 1, “The Problem,” author Jerry Coyne sets the historical stage for his suggestion that science and religion are not compatible and never will be.

2 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | July 1, 2015

Stoned, Anxious, The Deeper Genome, and Testosterone

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | July 1, 2015

July 2015's selection of notable quotes

4 Comments

image: Staying Active in the Lab

Staying Active in the Lab

By | July 1, 2015

Retiring as a professor, and even shutting down your own lab, doesn’t necessarily mean quitting research.

8 Comments

image: The War Rages On

The War Rages On

By | July 1, 2015

Conflict between science and religion continues, with effects on health, politics, and the environment.

4 Comments

image: Keeping Science Pubs Clean

Keeping Science Pubs Clean

By | June 29, 2015

Science releases new guidelines for research transparency, hoping to stem the tide of retractions and misconduct.

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image: Widespread Data Duplication

Widespread Data Duplication

By | June 17, 2015

Around one out of every four cancer papers scrutinized in a recent study contains questionable figures, and journals and authors aren’t responding to requests for clarification.

5 Comments

image: Sperm From Ovaries

Sperm From Ovaries

By | June 11, 2015

With the deletion of a single gene, female Japanese rice fish can produce sperm. 

1 Comment

image: Retractions Often Due to Plagiarism: Study

Retractions Often Due to Plagiarism: Study

By | June 1, 2015

The number of plagiarism-based retractions has grown since the advent of detection software, according to a BioMed Central analysis.

4 Comments

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