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image: Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

By | April 14, 2017

In laboratory experiments that simulated oceanic conditions, the fish responded to magnetic fields, a sensory input that may aid migration.

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A committee says an independent organization designed to foster research integrity would stem misconduct.

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image: Macchiarini Retracts Another Paper

Macchiarini Retracts Another Paper

By | March 22, 2017

The embattled thoracic surgeon blames his former employer, the Karolinska Institute, for losing data related to the retracted research.

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image: The Past and Present of Research Integrity in China

The Past and Present of Research Integrity in China

By | March 1, 2017

Several initiatives aim to improve research integrity in the country, but recent high-profile cases of misconduct highlight a lingering problem.

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Seventeen scientists found to have committed research misconduct during the last 25 years have since collectively received more than $101 million in NIH funding.

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image: Publication Ban Affects Former Collaborators

Publication Ban Affects Former Collaborators

By | February 23, 2017

When the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders fired neurologist Allen Braun, the agency also barred his colleagues from publishing data collected over a 25-year period.

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image: Image of the Day: Noisy Barriers

Image of the Day: Noisy Barriers

By | February 2, 2017

Traffic noise disrupts communication between dwarf mongooses and tree squirrels, according to a study.

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image: The Fungus that Poses as a Flower

The Fungus that Poses as a Flower

By | February 1, 2017

Mummy berry disease coats blueberry leaves with sweet, sticky stains that smell like flowers, luring in passing insects to spread fungal spores.

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image: Restoring a Native Island Habitat

Restoring a Native Island Habitat

By | January 30, 2017

Removal of non-native vegetation from an island ecosystem revives pollinator activity and, in turn, native plant growth. 

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Using simulations, scientists report that a mixture of termites and plant competition may be responsible for the strange patterns of earth surrounded by plants in the Namib desert. 

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