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image: Inflammation Drives Gut Bacteria Evolution

Inflammation Drives Gut Bacteria Evolution

By | March 16, 2017

Viruses within Salmonella rapidly spread genes throughout the bacterial population during a gut infection, scientists show.

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image: Human Gut Microbe Transplant Alters Mouse Behavior

Human Gut Microbe Transplant Alters Mouse Behavior

By | March 1, 2017

Fecal transplants from humans with irritable bowel syndrome and anxiety into mice lead to similar symptoms and anxiety-like behavior in the rodents, researchers report.  

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image: Image of the Day: Cell Scaffolding

Image of the Day: Cell Scaffolding

By | February 28, 2017

Human embryonic kidney cells use actin cytoskeletal networks to organize proteins on the surfaces of cell membranes.

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NASA researchers have discovered ancient microbes locked inside minerals, suggesting a possible niche for interstellar life.

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image: Toward Killing Cancer with Bacteria

Toward Killing Cancer with Bacteria

By | February 8, 2017

Researchers employ an engineered microbe to destroy tumor cells in mice.

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image: Image of the Day: Noisy Barriers

Image of the Day: Noisy Barriers

By | February 2, 2017

Traffic noise disrupts communication between dwarf mongooses and tree squirrels, according to a study.

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image: Discovering Novel Antibiotics

Discovering Novel Antibiotics

By | February 1, 2017

Three methods identify and activate silent bacterial gene clusters to uncover new drugs

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image: The Fungus that Poses as a Flower

The Fungus that Poses as a Flower

By | February 1, 2017

Mummy berry disease coats blueberry leaves with sweet, sticky stains that smell like flowers, luring in passing insects to spread fungal spores.

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image: Infographic: Following the Force

Infographic: Following the Force

By | February 1, 2017

Physical forces propagate from the outside of cells inward and vice versa.

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image: May the Force Be with You

May the Force Be with You

By | February 1, 2017

The dissection of how cells sense and propagate physical forces is leading to exciting new tools and discoveries in mechanobiology and mechanomedicine.

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