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image: Week in Review: October 24–28

Week in Review: October 24–28

By | October 27, 2016

Patient Zero exonerated; Jack Woodall dies; Wolbachia-harboring mosquitoes deployed in fight against Zika; implanted neurons function in adult mouse brain 

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Whole-genome sequencing of preserved blood samples provides the clearest picture to date of the virus’s arrival and spread in the U.S.

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image: Immunologist, AIDS Research Advocate Dies

Immunologist, AIDS Research Advocate Dies

By | September 24, 2015

William Paul, the National Institutes of Health’s Laboratory of Immunology chief, passed away at age 79.

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image: Cuba Ends Mother-To-Child HIV

Cuba Ends Mother-To-Child HIV

By | July 2, 2015

The Caribbean nation is the first to effectively eliminate the prenatal transmission of syphilis and the virus that causes AIDS, according to the World Health Organization.

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image: Outsmarting HIV

Outsmarting HIV

By | May 4, 2015

Small molecules that mimic the T-cell surface receptor CD4 could expose the virus to antibody-based immune responses.

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image: Attacking AIDS on Many Fronts

Attacking AIDS on Many Fronts

By | May 1, 2015

A close cooperation between science, politics, and economics has helped to control one of history’s most destructive epidemics.  

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image: Berlin Activist

Berlin Activist

By | May 1, 2015

Timothy Ray Brown, the first and only patient to ever be cured of AIDS, is bringing his message of hope to the search for a more widespread solution to the AIDS epidemic.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2015

The Genealogy of a Gene, On the Move, The Chimp and the River, and Domesticated

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image: Filippos Porichis: Immunoregulator

Filippos Porichis: Immunoregulator

By | May 1, 2015

Principal Investigator, Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard. Age: 33

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image: Hidden Menace

Hidden Menace

By , , and | May 1, 2015

Curing HIV means finding and eradicating viruses still lurking in the shadows.

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