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The lungs of extremely premature lambs supported in a closed, sterile environment that enables fluid-based gas exchange grow and develop normally, researchers report.

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image: Image of the Day: Stop Signals

Image of the Day: Stop Signals

By | April 17, 2017

Transcytosis, suppression of vesicle traffic across cells, helps reduce permeability in the blood-retinal barrier during development.

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image: Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

By | March 23, 2017

Murine neural tubes, with each image highlighting a different embryonic tissue type (blue). The neural tube itself (left) grows into the brain, spine, and nerves, while the mesoderm (middle) develops into other organs, and the ectoderm (right) forms skin, teeth, and hair.

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image: Consilience, Episode 2: In Tune

Consilience, Episode 2: In Tune

By | March 21, 2017

Ben Henry delves into the still-unanswered questions of where our musical preferences come from and what makes synesthetes tick.

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A species concept based on interacting nuclear and mitochondrial genes in bird species holds promise to more objectively define species.

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Researchers report growing a mouse embryo using two types of early stem cells.

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image: Tune Into the Animal Kingdom

Tune Into the Animal Kingdom

By | March 1, 2017

A survey of sounds from birds to whales to fruit flies to fish

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 Zebra finches reared by another species learn to sing their foster parents’ song with rhythms characteristic of their genetic background.

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Zebra finches dial down dopamine signaling when they hear errors in a song performance.

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image: Song Around the Animal Kingdom

Song Around the Animal Kingdom

By | March 1, 2017

Diverse species are said to sing, but music is in the ear of the beholder.

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