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image: Opinion: The Frustrating Process of Manuscript Submission

Opinion: The Frustrating Process of Manuscript Submission

By and | May 10, 2017

We suggest a centralized facility for submitting to journals—one that would benefit scientists and not only publishers.

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image: Opinion: Get to Know Why People Openly Share Genomic Data

Opinion: Get to Know Why People Openly Share Genomic Data

By | May 9, 2017

It’s not only about health but also about exploring ancestry and contributing to science.

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image: Opinion: When Science Meets Activism

Opinion: When Science Meets Activism

By | May 3, 2017

Scientists new to advocacy must find balance between embracing diverse perspectives and guarding against anti-scientific beliefs.

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The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

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Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

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image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

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The lungs of extremely premature lambs supported in a closed, sterile environment that enables fluid-based gas exchange grow and develop normally, researchers report.

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image: Image of the Day: Stop Signals

Image of the Day: Stop Signals

By | April 17, 2017

Transcytosis, suppression of vesicle traffic across cells, helps reduce permeability in the blood-retinal barrier during development.

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image: Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

By | March 23, 2017

Murine neural tubes, with each image highlighting a different embryonic tissue type (blue). The neural tube itself (left) grows into the brain, spine, and nerves, while the mesoderm (middle) develops into other organs, and the ectoderm (right) forms skin, teeth, and hair.

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Researchers report growing a mouse embryo using two types of early stem cells.

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