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image: CRISPR Used in Human Embryos to Probe Gene Function

CRISPR Used in Human Embryos to Probe Gene Function

By | September 20, 2017

OCT4 is necessary for blastocyst formation in the human embryo, researchers report.

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A study of a simple marine animal suggests that the common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians may have had three germ layers instead of two.

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image: Researchers Identify Clue to Asymmetric Cell Division

Researchers Identify Clue to Asymmetric Cell Division

By | September 1, 2017

Phosphorylation of a surface protein on endosomes is key to the organelles’ uneven distribution in daughter cells.

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image: Infographic: Why Not All Cell Divisions Are Equal

Infographic: Why Not All Cell Divisions Are Equal

By | September 1, 2017

Phosphorylation of a protein called Sara found on the surface of endosomes appears to be a key regulator of asymmetric splitting in fruit flies.

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image: A Bacterial Messenger Molecule Extends Healthspan

A Bacterial Messenger Molecule Extends Healthspan

By | August 28, 2017

E. coli that make indoles protect older worms, flies, and mice from frailty. 

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Surrounded by a projection screen, a fly’s flight path is influenced by a collection of moving dots.

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image: Virtual Reality for Freely Moving Animals

Virtual Reality for Freely Moving Animals

By | August 21, 2017

Experiments that place untethered fish, flies, and mice in simulated environments give clues about the animals’ social behavior.

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image: Image of the Day: Everybody Needs a Friend

Image of the Day: Everybody Needs a Friend

By | August 10, 2017

The protein encoded by the gene that causes Fragile X in humans partners with another protein, dNab2, to alter gene expression in fruit fly neurons.

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image: How Bacteria in Flies Kill Parasitic Wasps

How Bacteria in Flies Kill Parasitic Wasps

By | July 10, 2017

Ribosome-inactivating proteins from symbiotic bacteria leave their hosts unharmed.

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image: Image of the Day: Oculus Reparo

Image of the Day: Oculus Reparo

By | July 10, 2017

Following an injury to a Drosophila pupal wing, macrophages swoop in, engulfing debris and aiding in the tissue regeneration process.

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