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image: Cross-Sample Sequencing Contamination Galore

Cross-Sample Sequencing Contamination Galore

By | April 5, 2017

Scientists conducting a large-scale, comparative transcriptomics project have inadvertently highlighted widespread contamination in sequencing data.

3 Comments

image: Study: Most Long Noncoding RNAs Likely Functional

Study: Most Long Noncoding RNAs Likely Functional

By | March 2, 2017

Nearly 20,000 lncRNAs identified in human cells may play some role in cellular activities.

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image: Abundant Sequence Errors in Public Databases

Abundant Sequence Errors in Public Databases

By | February 16, 2017

A new algorithm reveals hoards of preparation-induced DNA mutations in publicly available human sequences.

2 Comments

image: Pardis Sabeti: An American Scientist Born in Iran

Pardis Sabeti: An American Scientist Born in Iran

By | February 9, 2017

When she entered the U.S. shortly before the Iranian revolution of 1979, the now 41-year-old geneticist was a refugee toddler. 

5 Comments

image: 2016 Top 10 Innovations: Honorable Mentions

2016 Top 10 Innovations: Honorable Mentions

By | December 1, 2016

These runners up to the Top 10 Innovations of 2016 caught our judges' attention.

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image: Social Media Accelerates Science

Social Media Accelerates Science

By | November 1, 2016

How researchers are taking advantage of Twitter and other forums to do, share, and discuss research

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image: Q&A: Sequencing Newborns

Q&A: Sequencing Newborns

By | October 21, 2016

Members of the BabySeq Project discuss trial enrollment, preliminary findings.

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Ambry Genetics CEO Aaron Elliott discusses his team’s recent analysis of 20,000 clinical next-generation sequencing panels.

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image: An Evolutionary History

An Evolutionary History

By | October 1, 2016

Celebrating 30 years and a resurrection

2 Comments

image: Techniques for Assessing Genomic Copy Number Variations

Techniques for Assessing Genomic Copy Number Variations

By | October 1, 2016

As the importance of genomic copy number variations for health and disease becomes clearer, researchers are creating new ways to detect these changes in the genome.

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