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image: Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

By | April 14, 2017

In laboratory experiments that simulated oceanic conditions, the fish responded to magnetic fields, a sensory input that may aid migration.

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image: A Panoply of Animal Senses

A Panoply of Animal Senses

By | September 1, 2016

Animals have receptors for feeling gravity, fluid flow, heat, and electric and magnetic fields.

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image: A Cornucopia of Sensory Perception

A Cornucopia of Sensory Perception

By | September 1, 2016

Forget what you learned about humans having five senses. That goes double for non-human animals.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | September 1, 2016

Sensory discoveries, open-access publishing, and candidates on climate changes

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image: Smart Skin Enables Magnetoreception

Smart Skin Enables Magnetoreception

By | September 1, 2016

Researchers develop a wearable technology that can detect magnetic fields and translate the signal into a visual display—a first step toward equipping humans with an entirely new sense.

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image: Sensory Biology Around the Animal Kingdom

Sensory Biology Around the Animal Kingdom

By | September 1, 2016

From detecting gravity and the Earth’s magnetic field to feeling heat and the movement of water around them, animals can do more than just see, smell, touch, taste, and hear.

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image: Opinion: Acquiring Extra Senses

Opinion: Acquiring Extra Senses

By | September 1, 2016

Animals’ diverse sensory abilities will guide a technology-based revolution that gives humans perception beyond our natural senses.

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image: Animal Magnetism

Animal Magnetism

By | May 1, 2016

A photosensitive protein behind the retinas of cockroaches plays a role in light-dependent, directional magnetosensitivity.

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image: Biological Compass

Biological Compass

By | November 16, 2015

A protein complex discovered in Drosophila may be capable of sensing magnetism and serves as a clue to how some animal species navigate using the Earth’s magnetic field.

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image: Alleged Scoop Sours Magnetoreceptor Collaboration

Alleged Scoop Sours Magnetoreceptor Collaboration

By | September 21, 2015

University administrators request a retraction upon learning that one researcher scooped another’s results despite having agreed not to.

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