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image: Cargo-Sorting DNA Robots

Cargo-Sorting DNA Robots

By | September 14, 2017

Autonomous molecules that collect, carry, and sort different genetic packages usher in a new era for nucleic-acid robotics. 

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image: Booger Bacteria’s Sweet Immune Suppression

Booger Bacteria’s Sweet Immune Suppression

By | September 6, 2017

Sweet taste receptor-activating molecules produced by sinus microbes suppress the local innate immune system in humans.

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image: An Immunological Timeline for Pregnancy

An Immunological Timeline for Pregnancy

By | September 1, 2017

A new study uses blood samples from pregnant women to track changes in the immune system leading up to birth, and predicts gestational age from the mothers’ immune signatures.

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image: How Immune Receptors Got into Mouse Noses

How Immune Receptors Got into Mouse Noses

By | September 1, 2017

A study traces proteins’ evolution from the immune to the olfactory system.

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image: Living Fabric

Living Fabric

By | September 1, 2017

See the bacteria-powered, breathable clothing made by former MIT researcher Wen Wang and colleagues.

2 Comments

image: Do Microbes Trigger Alzheimer’s Disease?

Do Microbes Trigger Alzheimer’s Disease?

By | September 1, 2017

The once fringe idea is gaining traction among the scientific community.

6 Comments

Emerging evidence links bacterial or viral infection with the neuropathology of Alzheimer’s disease.

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image: Dengue Infection Impairs Immune Defense Against Zika

Dengue Infection Impairs Immune Defense Against Zika

By | August 18, 2017

A memory B cell response to Zika virus in dengue-infected patients produced antibodies that were poorly neutralizing in vitro and instead enhanced infection.

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image: So You’ve Been Mistaken as a White Nationalist

So You’ve Been Mistaken as a White Nationalist

By | August 18, 2017

Biomedical engineer Kyle Quinn fends off a frenzied Internet mob after being wrongly identified as a Charlottesville protester.

9 Comments

image: First Organ-Specific Tissue Sheets

First Organ-Specific Tissue Sheets

By | August 9, 2017

The material is durable, flexible, and can serve as a scaffold for cell growth, a study shows.

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