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image: Riboswitch Flip Kills Bacteria

Riboswitch Flip Kills Bacteria

By | September 30, 2015

Scientists discover a novel antibacterial molecule that targets a vital RNA regulatory element.


image: New Legs to Stand On

New Legs to Stand On

By | June 1, 2015

Reconstructing the past using ancient DNA


image: Not So Noncoding

Not So Noncoding

By | June 1, 2015

An RNA thought to be noncoding in fact encodes a small protein that regulates calcium uptake in muscle.


image: Two-Faced RNAs

Two-Faced RNAs

By | April 1, 2015

The same microRNAs can have opposing roles in cancer.


image: Circadian Atlas Chronicles Gene Expression

Circadian Atlas Chronicles Gene Expression

By | October 27, 2014

Researchers have mapped the times of day when mouse genes are transcribed across 12 organs.

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image: Crossing Boundaries

Crossing Boundaries

By | September 1, 2014

A groundbreaker in the study of Listeria monocytogenes, Pascale Cossart continues to build her research tool kit to understand how to fight such intracellular human pathogens.


image: Human Proteome Mapped

Human Proteome Mapped

By | May 28, 2014

Compiling mass spectrometry profiles of human tissues and cell lines, two separate groups publish near-complete drafts of the human proteome.


image: RNA Puts Proteins in a Headlock

RNA Puts Proteins in a Headlock

By | May 20, 2014

A noncoding RNA initiates translation by grabbing hold of repressor proteins and restricting their functions.



October 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2012 issue of The Scientist.


image: Mission: Possible

Mission: Possible

By | October 1, 2012

Cooperation, not competition, is the way forward.

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