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» T cell and ecology

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image: Outsmarting HIV

Outsmarting HIV

By | May 4, 2015

Small molecules that mimic the T-cell surface receptor CD4 could expose the virus to antibody-based immune responses.

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image: Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

By | May 3, 2015

Species die-offs are expected to accelerate as greenhouse gases accumulate, according to a meta-analysis.

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image: Looking for Latent HIV

Looking for Latent HIV

By | May 1, 2015

Sequencing HIV integration sites suggests that clonally expanded T-cell populations may not be the main source of latent virus.

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image: Soluble Signal

Soluble Signal

By | May 1, 2015

An immune protein previously thought to mark inactive T cells has a free-floating form that correlates with HIV disease progression.

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image: Bees Drawn to Pesticides

Bees Drawn to Pesticides

By | April 24, 2015

One study shows the insects prefer food laced with pesticides, while another adds to the evidence that the chemicals are harmful to some pollinators.

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image: Protein Spurs T-Cell Proliferation

Protein Spurs T-Cell Proliferation

By | April 17, 2015

A newly discovered protein promotes immunity to viruses and cancer by triggering the production of cytotoxic T cells.

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image: Another CAR-T IPO

Another CAR-T IPO

By | April 6, 2015

Cellectis goes public for a whopping $228 million—nearly double the value the company filed for in February.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

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image: Long-Lived Immunotherapy Stem Cells

Long-Lived Immunotherapy Stem Cells

By | February 4, 2015

Genetically modified T memory stem cells persist in patients for more than 10 years, and can differentiate into a variety of T cell types.

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image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

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