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The public may still believe that male-specific traits, such as high testosterone levels, lead to many of the gender inequalities that exist in society, but science tells a different story.

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image: 2016 Life Sciences Salary Survey

2016 Life Sciences Salary Survey

By | November 1, 2016

Most researchers feel stimulated by their work but are dissatisfied with their compensation, according to this year’s results.

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image: On Race, Gender, and NIH Funding

On Race, Gender, and NIH Funding

By | August 1, 2016

The results of two studies suggest slightly different biases in the review of National Institutes of Health R01 grant applications from minority and/or women researchers.

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High school and college-level oral examiners graded women higher than men in male-dominated fields.

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image: Male Docs in Academia Earn More: Study

Male Docs in Academia Earn More: Study

By | July 12, 2016

Female physicians working at medical schools in the U.S. make about $51,000 less than their male counterparts on average.

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image: Gender Gap in Science Publishing

Gender Gap in Science Publishing

By | May 10, 2016

Study reveals trends in the frequency of female first authors on medical studies.

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image: Study: Men Get Bigger Start-Up Packages

Study: Men Get Bigger Start-Up Packages

By | September 17, 2015

A new analysis reveals yet another gender gap in science.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Women After All</em>

Book Excerpt from Women After All

By | February 2, 2015

In the introduction to his latest book, author Melvin Konner explains why he considers maleness a departure from normal physiology.

6 Comments

image: It’s Over, Man

It’s Over, Man

By | February 1, 2015

The era of human male domination is ending. Will modern culture welcome the dawn of a new gender equality?

7 Comments

image: On “Geniuses” and Gender Gaps

On “Geniuses” and Gender Gaps

By | January 19, 2015

Perceptions of a need for brilliance to excel in a field of study may contribute to its relatively low numbers of women, researchers report.

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