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image: GM Wheat Fails in the Field

GM Wheat Fails in the Field

By | June 26, 2015

A field trial of wheat genetically engineered to resist aphids fails to measure up to lab tests.

4 Comments

image: One Case Closes, Another Opens

One Case Closes, Another Opens

By | September 29, 2014

Unsure of the origins of a rogue crop found on an Oregon farm, the US Department of Agriculture is following up on a second issue related to genetically engineered wheat.

1 Comment

image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | July 28, 2014

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

0 Comments

image: A Lot to Chew On

A Lot to Chew On

By | June 1, 2014

Complex layers of science, policy, and public opinion surround the things we eat and drink.

0 Comments

image: Plant Scourges

Plant Scourges

By | June 1, 2014

A sampling of some of the most devastating crop pathogens

0 Comments

image: Rusty Waves of Grain

Rusty Waves of Grain

By | June 1, 2014

See how a ruinous fungus that attacks wheat wreaks its damage.

0 Comments

image: Putting Up Resistance

Putting Up Resistance

By | June 1, 2014

Will the public swallow science’s best solution to one of the most dangerous wheat pathogens on the planet?

7 Comments

image: Escaped GM Wheat

Escaped GM Wheat

By | July 18, 2013

The USDA is trying to figure out how genetically modified wheat got into an Oregon farmer’s field.

2 Comments

image: Fungus-Fighting Genes

Fungus-Fighting Genes

By | June 27, 2013

Two genes from wild relatives of wheat could save domestic wheat from fungal destruction.

1 Comment

image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | December 7, 2012

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

3 Comments

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