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image: Image of the Day: A Swell Idea

Image of the Day: A Swell Idea

By | July 19, 2017

To improve the resolution of biological samples at the cellular level, researchers inflate tissues with “swellable polymers” so that they’re easier to see under the microscope.    

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image: Q&A: Sequencing Newborns

Q&A: Sequencing Newborns

By | October 21, 2016

Members of the BabySeq Project discuss trial enrollment, preliminary findings.

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image: Pfizer to Buy Medivation for $14 Billion

Pfizer to Buy Medivation for $14 Billion

By | August 22, 2016

The pharma giant is purchasing the San Francisco–based cancer drugmaker to boost its oncology portfolio.

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image: Esteemed Cancer Surgeon Dies

Esteemed Cancer Surgeon Dies

By | August 12, 2015

Carolyn Kaelin, a breast cancer surgeon, survivor, and advocate has passed away at age 54.

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image: BRCA Breakthroughs?

BRCA Breakthroughs?

By | April 21, 2015

Color Genomics announces a new, lower-cost BRCA mutation test, while Inserm and Quest Diagnostics reveal plans to pool patient data to investigate rare mutations.

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A National Cancer Institute model forecasts a marked increase in estrogen receptor-positive tumors among older women by 2030.

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image: <em>BRCA</em> Mutations Mapped

BRCA Mutations Mapped

By | April 7, 2015

In a large study, researchers find evidence to suggest that the type and location of a woman’s BRCA1/2 mutations may affect her cancer risk.

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image: Three Retractions for Highly Cited Author

Three Retractions for Highly Cited Author

By | March 19, 2015

Robert Weinberg’s team at MIT is pulling three papers, noting some figure panels were composites of different experiments.

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image: Reduced Risk?

Reduced Risk?

By | October 22, 2014

A genome-wide association study identifies a SNP that could help explain the relatively low rates of breast cancer among Latina women.

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image: Light’s Dark Side

Light’s Dark Side

By | July 25, 2014

Exposure to dim light at night speeds the growth of human breast cancer tumors implanted into rats and makes the cancer resistant to the drug tamoxifen.

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