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Researchers solve the mystery of 15-year-old mutant ferns with disrupted sex determination.

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The public may still believe that male-specific traits, such as high testosterone levels, lead to many of the gender inequalities that exist in society, but science tells a different story.

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image: Famed Pediatric Endocrinologist Dies

Famed Pediatric Endocrinologist Dies

By | December 6, 2016

Melvin Grumbach, a clinician and researcher who described the hormonal dynamics of puberty and numerous endocrine disorders, has passed away at age 90.

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Male mice exposed to females, their urine, or a chemical in their urine lost sensory neurons in their vomeronasal organs that respond to that chemical.

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image: The Trouble With Sex in Science

The Trouble With Sex in Science

By | August 9, 2016

Researchers argue for the consideration of hormones and sex chromosomes in preclinical experiments.

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image: What’s in a Voice?

What’s in a Voice?

By | May 1, 2016

More than you think (or could make use of)

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image: “Hunger Hormone” No More?

“Hunger Hormone” No More?

By | April 20, 2016

Ghrelin promotes fat storage not feeding, according to a study.

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image: Newly Discovered Hormone Explains Disease

Newly Discovered Hormone Explains Disease

By | April 15, 2016

Patients with neonatal progeroid syndrome lack a glucose-releasing hormone, while people with insulin resistance have an abundance.

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image: Hunger Hormone Slows Aging in Mice

Hunger Hormone Slows Aging in Mice

By | February 3, 2016

Signs of getting older are less common among rodents with ramped-up ghrelin production.

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image: Hormone Hangover

Hormone Hangover

By | February 1, 2016

Medication to prevent prematurity in humans harms cognitive flexibility in rats.

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