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image: A Panoply of Animal Senses

A Panoply of Animal Senses

By | September 1, 2016

Animals have receptors for feeling gravity, fluid flow, heat, and electric and magnetic fields.

1 Comment

image: Fruit Flies Feel Humidity with Dedicated Receptors

Fruit Flies Feel Humidity with Dedicated Receptors

By | September 1, 2016

Drosophila antennae let the insects seek out moisture levels they like best.

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image: What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs

What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs

By | September 1, 2016

Odor, taste, and light receptors are present in many different parts of the body, and they have surprisingly diverse functions.

3 Comments

image: Olfactory Fingerprints

Olfactory Fingerprints

By | June 24, 2015

People can be identified by the distinctive ways they perceive odors, a new study shows.

1 Comment

image: Pleasure To Smell You

Pleasure To Smell You

By | March 4, 2015

People tend to sniff their mitts after shaking hands with someone of the same sex, suggesting that the traditional greeting may transmit chemosensory signals.

2 Comments

image: Vampire Bats Lack Bitter Taste

Vampire Bats Lack Bitter Taste

By | June 25, 2014

With a diet of blood, the flying mammals have largely lost the ability to taste bitter flavors.

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image: Making Sense of the Narwhal Tusk

Making Sense of the Narwhal Tusk

By | March 18, 2014

Emerging evidence suggests that the marine mammal’s long front tooth might help the narwhal sense environmental changes.  

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image: Feeding Frenzy

Feeding Frenzy

By | March 1, 2014

Take a peek into the shark tank where Boston University biologist Jelle Atema is testing how well the fish actually smell.

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image: Jaws, Reconsidered

Jaws, Reconsidered

By | March 1, 2014

Biologist Jelle Atema is putting the sensory capabilities of sharks to the test—and finding that the truth is more fascinating than fiction.

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image: Fly Leg Sensors Recognize Mates

Fly Leg Sensors Recognize Mates

By | July 1, 2013

Male fruit flies use a sensory system in their legs to help determine whether a potential mate is from a different species.

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