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image: Baboons Can Make Sounds Found in Human Speech

Baboons Can Make Sounds Found in Human Speech

By | January 13, 2017

The findings suggest language may have started to evolve millions of years earlier than once thought.  

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image: How Plant-Soil Feedback Affects Ecological Diversity

How Plant-Soil Feedback Affects Ecological Diversity

By | January 13, 2017

Researchers examine how underground microbes and nutrients affect plant populations.

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image: Adaptation, Island Style

Adaptation, Island Style

By | January 3, 2017

Anole lizards inhabiting the Caribbean islands display some of the key principles of evolution.

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The small lizards adapted to unique niches among dozens of isles.

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image: How an Invasive Bee Managed to Thrive in Australia

How an Invasive Bee Managed to Thrive in Australia

By | January 1, 2017

The Asian honeybee should have been crippled by low genetic diversity, but thanks to natural selection it thrived.

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The public may still believe that male-specific traits, such as high testosterone levels, lead to many of the gender inequalities that exist in society, but science tells a different story.

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image: More Anti-CRISPR Proteins to Block Cas9

More Anti-CRISPR Proteins to Block Cas9

By | December 29, 2016

The latest CRISPR deactivators to be discovered turn off the Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 widely used in genome editing.

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image: Fruit Bats Argue Using Nuanced Communication

Fruit Bats Argue Using Nuanced Communication

By | December 29, 2016

Audio recordings of bats hashing out disputes reveals that their calls are laden with information about identity and intent.

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image: New CRISPR-Cas Enzymes Discovered

New CRISPR-Cas Enzymes Discovered

By | December 22, 2016

A metagenomics analysis finds Cas9 in archaea for the first time, along with two previously unknown Cas nucleases from bacteria.

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Standard taxonomy lumps together bird species that should be separate, a new study suggests, raising the total number of estimated species from 9,000 to 18,000.

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