Advertisement
RayBiotech
RayBiotech

The Scientist

» cell division

Most Recent

image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

4 Comments

image: Honeybee Compound for Hair Loss?

Honeybee Compound for Hair Loss?

By | December 11, 2014

Propolis, a natural product used by honeybees to repair their hives, stimulates hair growth in shaved mice.

1 Comment

image: A Cellar’s Cellular Treasure, 1992

A Cellar’s Cellular Treasure, 1992

By | December 1, 2014

A spring cleaning led to the rediscovery of Theodor Boveri’s microscope slides, presumed lost during World War II.

0 Comments

image: Nuclear Pore QA

Nuclear Pore QA

By | December 1, 2014

A known membrane-remodeling complex earns a newly identified role as a quality-assurance director during the assembly of nuclear pores.

0 Comments

image: One Man's Trash...

One Man's Trash...

By | December 1, 2013

Scientists who dared to waste their time looking at the midbody, a remnant of cell division, have catapulted the organelle to new prominence.

2 Comments

image: Microchannel Masterpiece

Microchannel Masterpiece

By | December 1, 2012

A precision microfluidic system enables single-cell analysis of growth and division.

0 Comments

image: DNA, Contortionist

DNA, Contortionist

By | August 1, 2012

The DNA forms known as G-quadruplexes are finally discovered in human cells.

0 Comments

image: Ubiquitin Chains in Action

Ubiquitin Chains in Action

By | July 1, 2012

Present in every tissue of the body, ubiquitin appears to be involved in a dizzying array of functions, from cell cycle and division to organelle and ribosome biogenesis, as well as the response to viral infection. The protein plays at least two role

0 Comments

image: Telomere Basics

Telomere Basics

By | May 1, 2012

Telomeres are repetitive, noncoding sequences that cap the ends of linear chromosomes. They consist of hexameric nucleotide sequences (TTAGGG in humans) repeated hundreds to thousands of times. 

4 Comments

image: Truth and Beauty

Truth and Beauty

By | April 1, 2012

With strong foundations in both art and science, Ahna Skop has been able to capture the marvel of—and mechanisms behind—cytokinesis.

4 Comments

Advertisement

Popular Now

  1. Opinion: Too Many Mitochondrial Genome Papers
  2. Antibiotics and the Gut Microbiome
  3. Sex Differences in Pain Pathway
  4. The Brain on Fear
    The Scientist The Brain on Fear

    Scientists uncover the neurons in the mouse brain responsible for linking the sight of a looming object to scared behavior.

Advertisement
Advertisement
The Scientist