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image: Stopping Invasive Insects With Sex Appeal

Stopping Invasive Insects With Sex Appeal

By | September 17, 2014

Researchers find a way to zap emerald ash borers using female decoys.

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image: Dustup Over Lionfish Science Fair Project

Dustup Over Lionfish Science Fair Project

By | July 23, 2014

A former graduate student says he feels slighted by a failure to attribute his contributions to a line of research regarding the salinity tolerances of an invasive species.

15 Comments

image: Grade-schooler Schools Ecologists

Grade-schooler Schools Ecologists

By | July 23, 2014

A sixth grader’s science project on the salinity tolerance of lionfish inspires an academic researcher to confirm the student’s results, expanding knowledge of an invasive species.

4 Comments

image: Combating Asian Carp

Combating Asian Carp

By | June 5, 2014

A new plan to protect the Great Lakes from the invasive species is set in motion.

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image: A Lot to Chew On

A Lot to Chew On

By | June 1, 2014

Complex layers of science, policy, and public opinion surround the things we eat and drink.

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image: Carpe Carp!

Carpe Carp!

By | June 1, 2014

Can putting invasive species on the menu contain troublesome animals and plants?

5 Comments

image: Catch of the Day

Catch of the Day

By | June 1, 2014

Meet the Springfield, Illinois-based fish monger seeking to cultivate a taste for invasive Asian carp.

1 Comment

image: Clean Wood = Fewer Insects

Clean Wood = Fewer Insects

By | May 28, 2014

A study finds that fumigating or heat treating wooden pallets and crates can slow the spread of bark- and wood-boring insect pests such as the emerald ash borer.

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image: Rock Snot Explained

Rock Snot Explained

By | May 8, 2014

An increasingly common algal growth, found in rivers the world over, is caused by changing environmental conditions, not accidental introductions.

1 Comment

image: Finch-Powered Fumigation

Finch-Powered Fumigation

By | May 7, 2014

Darwin’s finches use pesticide-treated cotton to line their nests and unwittingly protect themselves against parasitic fly larvae.

0 Comments

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