The Scientist

» insect behavior

Most Recent

image: Image of the Day: Trade Deals

Image of the Day: Trade Deals

By | January 25, 2017

The forces of supply and demand appear influence paper wasp (Polistes dominula) populations. When more nest options are available, helper wasps work fewer hours to earn membership in a colony.

0 Comments

image: A Most Kinky Moth

A Most Kinky Moth

By | May 1, 2015

A retired entomologist discovers a world of behavioral diversity in the courtship rituals of a well-studied moth species.

0 Comments

image: Cooperative Control

Cooperative Control

By | February 10, 2015

With the help of a virus that infects its prey’s nervous system, a parasitoid wasp coerces a lady beetle to protect its young.

1 Comment

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | February 13, 2014

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

0 Comments

image: Tenacious Termites

Tenacious Termites

By | February 1, 2014

Formosan subterranean termites evade deadly pathogens by building nests lined with their own feces.

0 Comments

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | December 6, 2013

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

0 Comments

image: Little Drummer Bugs

Little Drummer Bugs

By | December 1, 2013

South African termites can relay vibrational alarm signals through their enormous nests by pounding their heads against the ground.

0 Comments

image: Waiting in the Wings

Waiting in the Wings

By | December 1, 2013

A century’s worth of collected butterflies shed light on how climate change threatens the survival of early-emerging species.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe
    Daily News UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe

    The European Patent Office will grant patent rights over the use of CRISPR in all cell types to a University of California team, contrasting with a recent decision in the U.S.

  2. DNA Replication Errors Contribute to Cancer Risk
  3. Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?
    Daily News Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?

    With its announced launch of a whole-exome sequencing service for apparently healthy individuals, Ambry Genetics is the latest company to enter this growing market. But whether these services are useful for most people remains up for debate.  

  4. Rethinking a Cancer Drug Target
    Daily News Rethinking a Cancer Drug Target

    The results of a CRISPR-Cas9 study suggest that MELK—a protein thought to play a critical role in cancer—is not necessary for cancer cell survival.

Business Birmingham