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image: Pumpkins Saved By People?

Pumpkins Saved By People?

By | November 25, 2015

Domestication may have saved pumpkins, gourds, and squash as seed dispersers like the mastodon went extinct. 


image: Farming Sped Eurasian Evolution

Farming Sped Eurasian Evolution

By | November 24, 2015

New clues from ancient DNA reveal the remarkable effect of agriculture on adaptation in Stone Age humans who lived across Europe.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | November 19, 2015

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes


image: Rethinking the Rise of Mammals

Rethinking the Rise of Mammals

By | November 16, 2015

Mammals diversified 30 million years later than previously estimated, according to a new analysis of an ancient fossil.


image: New Route to Hearing Loss Mapped

New Route to Hearing Loss Mapped

By | November 5, 2015

Deficiency in a protein called pejvakin makes inner ear cells more vulnerable to sound, unable to brace themselves against oxidative stress stimulated by noise. 


image: A Tiny Missing Link?

A Tiny Missing Link?

By | November 2, 2015

The common ancestor of all apes, including great apes and humans, may have been not-so-great in stature.


image: Evolution of the Penis

Evolution of the Penis

By | October 30, 2015

A phallus-less reptile goes through a developmental stage with external genitalia, suggesting a common origin for the organ among amniotes.


image: Dogs Originated in Central Asia

Dogs Originated in Central Asia

By | October 21, 2015

Man’s best friend was domesticated near Nepal and Mongolia at least 15,000 years ago, according to a genetic analysis.

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image: Life Before 4 Billion Years Ago?

Life Before 4 Billion Years Ago?

By | October 20, 2015

A new estimate of the origin of life on Earth pushes back the date by 300 million years.

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image: Antioxidants Facilitate Melanoma Metastasis

Antioxidants Facilitate Melanoma Metastasis

By | October 7, 2015

Two compounds boost the ability of melanoma cells to invade other tissues in mice, providing additional evidence that antioxidants can be beneficial to malignant cells as well as healthy ones.


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