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image: Coming to Terms

Coming to Terms

By | November 1, 2012

New noninvasive methods of selecting the most viable embryo could revolutionize in vitro fertilization.

11 Comments

image: The Sharper Image

The Sharper Image

By | October 1, 2012

Advances in light microscopy allow the mapping of cell migration during embryogenesis and capture dynamic processes at the cellular level.

1 Comment

image: Of Frogs and Embryos

Of Frogs and Embryos

By | September 1, 2012

Associate Professor in Molecular Cell & Developmental Biology at the University of Texas at Austin, John Wallingford, makes his living using cutting-edge microscopic techniques to watch developmental events unfold in real time.

4 Comments

image: Taking the Long View

Taking the Long View

By | September 1, 2012

In exploring how embryos take shape, John Wallingford has identified a key pathway involved in vertebrate development—and human disease.

0 Comments

image: Never Say Never

Never Say Never

By | February 1, 2012

Novel observations can sometimes be correct for unexpected reasons.

12 Comments

image: Embryos Right Genetic Wrongs?

Embryos Right Genetic Wrongs?

By | July 8, 2011

New evidence supports an old idea that embryos with genetic abnormalities can somehow fix themselves early in development.

21 Comments

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