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image: More-Stable DNA Origami

More-Stable DNA Origami

By | July 23, 2015

Scientists build nanoscale mesh models of a rabbit and a human stick figure, among other things. 

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image: BIOMOD

BIOMOD

By | July 1, 2015

Scientist to Watch Shawn Douglas explains the annual competition he established to introduce students to molecular programming.

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image: Shawn Douglas: DNA Programmer

Shawn Douglas: DNA Programmer

By | July 1, 2015

Assistant professor, Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, University of California, San Francisco. Age: 34

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image: Hawkmoth Brains Slow During Dusk Meals

Hawkmoth Brains Slow During Dusk Meals

By | June 15, 2015

This helps the insects collect as much visual information as possible from the gently swaying flowers on which they dine.

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image: Turning Over a New Leaf

Turning Over a New Leaf

By | June 1, 2015

Meet William Greenleaf, Stanford University geneticist and June 2015's Scientist to Watch

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image: William Greenleaf: Born for Biophysics

William Greenleaf: Born for Biophysics

By | June 1, 2015

Assistant Professor, Department of Genetics, Stanford University. Age: 35

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image: Self-Drying Skin

Self-Drying Skin

By | March 11, 2015

Tiny water-repellent spines on a gecko’s skin help keep the lizard dry in humid conditions.

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image: Q&A: A Taste for Science

Q&A: A Taste for Science

By | February 9, 2015

A conversation with biophysicist Christophe Lavelle

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image: Mollusk Mockup

Mollusk Mockup

By | February 1, 2015

Researchers develop a “micro-scallop” meant to glide through biological fluids by opening and closing a pair of silicone shells.

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image: Shell Games

Shell Games

By | February 1, 2015

See how scallop locomotion informed the design of a microscopic robot that could one day navigate our circulatory systems.

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