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image: Neurometabolic Disorders Could Contribute to Depression

Neurometabolic Disorders Could Contribute to Depression

By | November 1, 2016

Impairments in the production of neurotransmitters may lead to depression in some patients, preliminary results show, opening new avenues for research.

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Results from experiments in mice revise a long-held hypothesis that certain protein scaffolds are needed for synaptic activity.

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image: Clues to Lithium’s Mechanism

Clues to Lithium’s Mechanism

By | July 8, 2016

A study in roundworms hints at how the drug may exert therapeutic effects.

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image: Out in the Cold

Out in the Cold

By | March 1, 2016

Serotonin’s long-debated role in sleep promotion is temperature-dependent.

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image: Sleep Circuit

Sleep Circuit

By | March 1, 2016

A web of cell types in one of the brain’s chief wake centers keeps animals up—but also puts them to sleep.

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image: Circuit Dynamo

Circuit Dynamo

By | October 1, 2015

Eve Marder’s quest to understand neurotransmitter signaling is more than 40 years old and still going strong.

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image: An Eye for Detail

An Eye for Detail

By | October 1, 2014

Vision researcher John Dowling has spent a lifetime studying the neural architecture of the retina. He is closing his laboratory after 53 years, opting to extend these studies as a postdoc.

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image: Molecular Neuroscientist Dies

Molecular Neuroscientist Dies

By | August 11, 2014

Stephen Heinemann, who along with his colleagues identified the genes encoding the major excitatory neurotransmitter receptors in the brain, has passed away at age 75.

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image: Minis Ensure Synaptic Maturation

Minis Ensure Synaptic Maturation

By | May 7, 2014

Once considered neurotransmission-related noise, scientists now show that the spontaneous release of presynaptic vesicles is imperative for the maturation of Drosophila synapses.

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image: Telomeres Show Signs of Early-Life Stress

Telomeres Show Signs of Early-Life Stress

By | April 7, 2014

Reduction in telomere length is associated with stress early on in life and may have a genetic component, researchers find.

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