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image: The Ever-Expanding T-Cell World: A Primer

The Ever-Expanding T-Cell World: A Primer

By | August 7, 2017

Researchers continue to identify new T-cell subtypes—and devise ways to use them to fight cancer. The Scientist attempts to catalog them all.

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image: Company Sells a “Biological Age” Kit

Company Sells a “Biological Age” Kit

By | August 2, 2017

While the epigenetic clock is a useful tool for research and has solid scientific backing, scientists say the product’s use to consumers is limited.

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Another case of HIV remission emerges, this time in a South African girl diagnosed as an infant and disease-free for more than eight years.

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image: Mammalian Immunity: What’s RNAi Got to Do with It?

Mammalian Immunity: What’s RNAi Got to Do with It?

By | July 21, 2017

A new study adds to the evidence that mammalian cells can use small interfering RNAs to defend against viruses, but questions remain about physiological importance.

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image: Epigenetic Inheritance in Nematodes

Epigenetic Inheritance in Nematodes

By | July 17, 2017

The memory of a temperature spike can persist for as many as 14 generations in C. elegans.

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Using single-cell RNA sequencing, scientists characterize new populations of dendritic cells and monocytes.

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image: The Evolutionary Roots of Instinct

The Evolutionary Roots of Instinct

By | July 17, 2017

Did behaviors that seem ingrained become fixed through epigenetic mechanisms and ancestral learning?

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image: Worms’ Epigenetic Memories

Worms’ Epigenetic Memories

By | July 17, 2017

When kept at warmer temperatures for five generations, C. elegans showed evidence of “remembering” that experience for up to 14 generations.

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image: RNA Protects “Naked” Genomes from Retrotransposons

RNA Protects “Naked” Genomes from Retrotransposons

By | June 30, 2017

Transfer RNA fragments prevent jumping genes from hopping around in the mouse embryo, when histone methylation can’t do the job.

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image: T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

By | June 20, 2017

Overzealous activity by mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells in response to bacterial toxins can lead to illness instead of stopping it.

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